Japanese Language Lessons.
 
LESSON 2 - Yota's Room
In this lesson, Yota Suzuki and Jason Miller discuss items in Yota's room. This lesson will teach you how to greet and to carry out a conversation in Japanese. In this dialog, Yota Suzuki and Jason Miller meet for the first time at Jason's house in Tokyo.
 
 

Dialog.
 
  Jason: Ohayoo Gozaimasu.  
    Good morning.  
  Yota: Ohayoo Gozaimasu.  
    Good morning.  
  Jason: Sore wa nan desu ka.  
    What is that?  
  Yota: Kore desu ka. Kore wa kamera desu.  
    This? This is a camera.  
  Jason: Dare no kamera desu ka.  
    Whose camera is it?  
  Yota: Watashi no kamera desu.  
    It is my camera.  
  Jason: Sore mo anata no desu ka.  
    Is that also yours?  
  Yota: Iie, kono konpyuutaa wa tomodachi no desu.  
    No, this computer is my friend's.  
  Jason: Kore wa Nihon-go de nan desu ka.  
    What is this (item) in Japanese?  
  Yota: Nihon-go de sore wa "denwa" desu.  
    In Japanese, that is a telephone.  
  Jason: Jaa, are wa.  
    Then, how about that over there?  
  Yota: Are wa hon de, kore wa zasshi desu.  
    That over there is a book and this is a magazine.  
Listen Listen to Dialog up to this point. (.wav file)

Go to Top
 
 

Vocabulary.
 
ohayoo gozaimasu good morning
sore that
kore this
are that over there
nan what
kamera camera
dareno whose
kono this (possessive)
konpyuutaa computer
Nihon-go Japanese
denwa telephone
hon book
zasshi magazine
Listen Listen to Vocabulary. (.wav file)

Go to Top
 
 

Grammar.
 
1. Kore wa Kamera desu.
 

The sentence means literally "As for this, it is a camera". A better English translation would be "This is a camera". The sentence pattern is Kore wa noun desu, which translates as "This is Noun". Kore, sore, are and dore are a group of related words meaning "this", "that", "that over there" and "which"

 
kore this
sore that
are that over there (further away)
dore which

Examples: Sore wa konpyuutaa desu.
(That is a computer.)
  Are wa daigaku desu.
(That over there is a college.)

 
 
2. Kore desu ka. Kore wa denwa desu.
 

This sentence means "This? This is a telephone". The pattern "Noun desu ka" in the beginning of the sentence is for emphasis.

 
Examples: Watashi desu ka. Watashi wa Itaria-jin desu.
(Me? I am Italian [Itaria = Italy])
  Are desu ka. Are wa tomodachi no konpyuutaa desu.
(That over there? It is my friend's computer.)

 
 
3. Dare no kamera desu ka.
 

This sentence means "Whose camera is it?" Dare means "who" and dare no implies "whose". No is a particle that shows possession between two nouns. In this sentence, the subject sore wa is omitted because in Japanese, if the subject is already mentioned, it is not necessary to repeat it.

 
Examples: Dare no konpyuutaa desu ka.
(Whose computer is it?)
  Dare no denwa desu ka.
(Whose telephone is it?)

 
 
4. Watashi no kamera desu.
 

This sentence means "This is my camera". Again, the subject is omitted for the same reason as seen in #3. Watashi no implies "my" and anata no implies "your". The sentence pattern with no has the first noun possessing the second. For instance, Miraa-san no zasshi means "Miller's magazine".

 
Examples: Sore wa anata no denwa desu.
(That is your telephone.)
  Kore wa Waatamanu-san no hon desu.
(This is Mr. Waterman's book.)

 
 
5. Iie, kono konpyuutaa wa tomodachi no desu.
 

This sentence means "No, this computer is my friend's". The words tomodachi no mean "friend's", with konpyuutaa being understood since it was already mentioned as a topic. Kono konpyuutaa means "this computer". Kono, sono, ano and dono are a group of related words that show possession of a noun, meaning "this", "that", "that over there", and "which". Kore, sore, are and dore cannot show possession but stand alone in their meaning. Kono, sono, ano and dono can only show possession and cannot stand alone.

 
Examples: Sono zasshi wa Kaatan-san no desu.
(That magazine is Mr. Cartin's.)
  Ano denwa wa Miraa-san no desu.
(That telephone over there is Mr. Miller's.)
  Dono hon wa Suzuki-san no desu ka.
(Which book is Mr. Suzuki's?)
  Kono hon wa tomodachi no desu.
(This book is my friend's.)
  Kore wa tomodachi no desu.
(This is my friend's.)

 
6. Kore wa Nihon-go de nan desu ka.
 

This sentence means "What is it in Japanese?" or "How do you say it in Japanese?" The word de is a particle that signifies "in" when referring to a language.

Thus, Nihon-go de means "in Japanese". The word Nihon-go is a compound of the two words, Nihon and go. Go means "language" and when added to the end of a country name, it signifies the language of that country.

 
Examples: Kore wa Doitsu-go de nan desu ka.
(What is this in German? [What do you call this in German?])
  Itaria-go de sore wa "libro" desu.
(In Italian, that is "libro".)

 
 
7. Jaa, are wa.
 

This sentence means "Then, how about that over there?" The sentence should be Jaa, are wa nan desu ka. Again, since nan desu ka is already mentioned and understood, it can be omitted. If you do not want to omit it, it is perfectly fine to say Jaa, are wa nan desu ka.

 
Examples: Kore wa nan desu ka.
(What is this?)
  Sore wa hon desu.
(That is a book.)
  Jaa, kore wa.
(Then, what is this?)
  Sore wa denwa desu.
(That is a telephone.)

 
 
8. Are wa hon de, kore wa zasshi desu.
 

This sentence means "That over there is a book and this is a magazine". De, in this case, is a shortened form of desu. It means "something is X, and something is Y".

 
Examples: Kore wa kamera de are wa konpyuutaa desu.
(This is a camera and that over there is a computer.)
  Waatamanu-san wa Amerika-jin de Rozenbawa-san wa Doitsu-jin desu.
(Mr. Waterman is American and Mr. Rosenbauer is German.)

Listen Listen to the sentences in Grammar notes. (.wav file)

Go to Top
 
 
Drill.
 

A. Fill in the blanks with the appropriate words.
1. kore wa ( ) desu ka.
2. ( (this) ) wa kamera desu.
3. Are ( ) watashi ( ) desu.
4. Kono konpyutaa wa ( (whose) ) desu ka.
5. Are ( ) denwa ( ), kore ( ) kamera desu.
B. Say the following in Japanese.
1. What is this?

2. Whose camera is it?

3. Is this yours?

4. This is my friend's computer.

5. This is my magazine.
answer Click here to check the answers!!

Go to Top